Woodland Park Zoo Logo

Thursday, March 17, 2016

A study in green

Posted by: Valerie Paquin, Marketing

If we asked you to describe Woodland Park Zoo in one color, your response would surely be green. The zoo’s abundant foliage is a result of both our dedicated horticulture team and the natural, verdant wonder of the Northwest. 

Aerial view of Woodland Park Zoo. Photo: Ryan Hawk/Woodland Park Zoo.

There are also many green animal species at the zoo, and their coloring serves a greater purpose than not getting pinched on St. Patrick’s Day. Used for camouflage, warning signals or displays, these brilliant hues make us green with envy.

Photo: Ryan Hawk/Woodland Park Zoo.

The bright, contrasting colors of poison dart frogs are a beautiful warning of their toxicity to predators. Although able to avoid most predation with their stunning coloration, some poison dart frogs are threatened or endangered due to habitat loss and other threats. 

Photo: Dennis Dow/Woodland Park Zoo.

Found in the rain forests of South America, emerald tree boas are leafy green with white, lightning-bolt markings. This pattern is perfect camouflage in the lush understory, concealing these remarkable reptiles from predators and prey alike.

Photo: Mat Hayward/Woodland Park Zoo.

Peacocks have every reason to be proud of their dazzling courtship displays. Peahens can’t help but be captivated by their arches of iridescent green plumes with electric blue eyespots, as well as a distinct mating call and mesmerizing dance.

Photo: Ryan Hawk/Woodland Park Zoo.

Leaf insects ranging through parts of Asia to Australia mimic the surrounding greenery with astonishing accuracy. Their color, shape, veining, and brown, ragged edges are complimented by their trembling movements to look exactly like leaves rustling gently in the wind.

Photo: Dennis Dow/Woodland Park Zoo.

Woodland Park Zoo staff gladly display their green uniforms. We wear green to express our love of the Earth, our commitment to clean energy, and a promise to fight for a sustainable future for people and wildlife alike.

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